Blanket for Squeaky

The jump-off point for this blanket was Barbara Albright’s Amish-Inspired Afghan from the book Oddball Knitting.  I liked the somewhat incongruous colors, the neutral border, the simple yarn (Lamb’s Pride, one of my favorites).  After pondering what I wanted to do for many weeks–hauling out stash yarn, looking at online retailers, browsing catalogs–I decided to use Lion Brand Wool-Ease because I already had a bunch of it, it’s inexpensive, it’s washable, and it was good enough for my son’s baby blanket.  So why not his sister’s?

Up until the finishing, this makes for an awesome take-anywhere project.  What could be easier than garter stitch squares?

The blanket is named Squeaky for the noisy baby to whom it was given and because of the 80% acrylic content of the yarn (not that it actually squeaked while I knit it).

Ravel it!

Size

Squares are 10″x10″.  Finished blanket with border is approximately 32″x42″

Materials

Worsted weight wool, 75g each of 12 different colors.  100g of 13th color for seaming and the border.  Yarn is held doubled throughout.

I used Lion Brand Wool-Ease (85g/180m), 1 skein each in 13 different colors: 195 Azalea Pink, 138 Cranberry, 191 Violet, 116 Delft (discontinued), 115 Blue Mist, 174 Avocado, 196 Zinnia, 180 Forest Green Heather, 173 Sage, 179 Chestnut Heather, 107 Blue Heather, 140 Rose Heather, and 099 Fisherman.  If you seam the squares together with the Fisherman cream, you will need more than one skein of that.  My finished blanket weighs 800 grams.

US 10.5 (6.5 mm) straights

Crochet hooks in I (5.5 mm) and P (10 mm).

Large-eye tapestry needle and snips.

Gauge

Approximately 6.5 sts and 6 rows per inch in garter stitch.

Directions

To make the squares:

With yarn held doubled, CO 32 stitches.

Knit 58 rows, slipping the first stitch of every row purl-wise with yarn held in front.  This makes for a cleaner edge that’s fast to seam up.

BO all stitches loosely.

Repeat to make 12 squares or however many you need for your blanket.

Finishing

Before seaming, weave in ends on all the squares.

Seaming:

Decide on your blanket layout, taking into consideration color as well as the direction of the garter stitch, which you can choose to alternate like I did.

I am not a crocheter so I will describe what I did to finish my blanket in simple terms.  Please feel free to put your blanket together in the manner you prefer.

Select your first two squares.  With right sides held together, using size I crochet hook and doubled yarn (in Fisherman or whatever color you choose), put a slip stitch on your crochet hook then *use the hook to go through an edge stitch of each square.  Yarn over the hook and pull the yarn through all three loops on your hook.  You should have one loop left on your hook.*  Repeat from the asterisk across the square.  I think this is called single crochet.

I recommend joining the squares in strips, then joining the strips.  I did three squares to a strip, then four strips to make the blanket.

Border:

I thought I would do a knit-on border but the reality was that I did not have a cord long enough to accommodate all the stitches.  I also did not have the brain power at 9 months pregnant to deal with alternate methods of holding live stitches while I worked my way around.  Crochet it was!

With size P crochet hook and doubled yarn in Fisherman, work a row of single crochet all the way around the blanket.  I worked a single crochet twice in the two stitches that flank each corner point to ensure fullness at the corner.  I used the large hook to make sure the border would not be too tight.  I recommend starting a stitch or two away from a corner rather than right at the corner since corners need a little extra love to look good.

Switch to size I hook (continue using double yarn) and work two half-double crochet stitches into each single.  This creates a nice ruffle that isn’t too bulky or lacy (for tiny fingers).

Weave in all those ends from seaming and the border.

Wrap around a cute baby.

  3 comments for “Blanket for Squeaky

  1. Liz
    May 30, 2012 at 9:36 am

    Your directions are just great! I am not a crocheter either, and these directions are exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much. I appreciate this and will definitely be back for more.

    • May 30, 2012 at 1:26 pm

      You’re welcome, Liz! Thanks for stopping by.

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